Painting Eucalyptus trees with watercolor: Surface colors and textures

Painting Eucalyptus treee surface textures

Again, while the trunk is still wet, drop in a stronger (thicker) mix of Burnt Sienna, here and there to give the impression of different colors on the tree’s bark. As this particular eucalyptus tree has quite light bark, do not overdo the amount of Burnt Sienna you drop in. Notice that there is a bead of paint building up at the bottom of the trunk, this should give you an idea of how wet the process is.

Gum Tree surface textures starting with burnt sienna
Gum Tree surface textures starting with burnt sienna
Gum tree demonstration add even thicker mix of burnt sienna watercolor
Gum tree demonstration add even thicker mix of burnt sienna

Into the Burnt Sienna patches drop in an even thicker mix of paint, made up of Burnt Sienna with a little French Ultramarine. Don’t paint over the whole area of each patch; you are trying to create variety of shapes and tones on your tree trunk. If you create a shape you like, don’t touch it!

Gum tree roots and dropped branches and bark
Gum tree roots and dropped branches and bark

Put an even stronger mix (about the consistency of double cream) of Burnt Sienna and French Ultramarine, near the bottom of the trunk on the side away from the light, just a touch or two.

Now using the point of your brush drag the bead of paint at the bottom of the trunk to the sides, this will create the impression of roots.

I have also thrown in a few quick dry brush strokes to give the look of fallen bark and branches (this is not important and can be done at the end of the painting).

Finishing the trunk of the eucalyptus tree with watercolor paint
Finishing the trunk of the eucalyptus tree

At this point you may add some French Ultramarine and Burnt Sienna mix to create the appearance of dark bark on the sides of the trunk, near the bottom mainly, but can also go higher up. See the left side of the trunk.

The trunk of our eucalyptus tree is done for now. Later you can either leave it as it is or you can place the odd dry brush stroke here and there on the surface to give the impression of bark – it is not critical to do this however.

You can let the trunk dry while you now mix the foliage colors.

Continue to: Painting Gum Trees with watercolor, the foliage