Category Archives: Color Mixing

How to mix watercolors to achieve the color you are after.

How to mix greens using watercolors

Watercolor painting by Joe Cartwright, titled North Richmond Farmland.

One of the questions I am most frequently asked by my students has to do with how to mix greens. No other color generates as much confusion regarding how it is mixed. Green is produced when you mix blue with yellow. However, as most blue and yellow pigments are not pure colors i.e. they contain Continue Reading …

How to use color thumbnails to change mood

Coastal Seascape watercolor painting by Margaret Ng, new color scheme

Recently one of my students painted a nice watercolor seascape. Her reference photo was of a coastal scene at Port Macquarie, NSW, Australia. It was of a bright day and her original painting reflected this. However she wanted to change the mood of her painting and was not sure how to go about it. So Continue Reading …

Watercolor Landscape Painting Demonstration of Mountain Valley Scene

Watercolor painting From Tamborine Mountain, Queensland

Latest watercolor landscape demonstration I have just posted my latest landscape demonstration. This watercolor (watercolour) painting is of the view from Mt Tamborine in Queensland, Australia. The demo teaches how to handle green in the landscape as well as creating a distant vista with watercolor.  How to utilise tree shapes to enhance the composition and Continue Reading …

Earth watercolors and color mixing

French Ultramarine mixed with Burnt Sienna gives a strong dark color

Using Earth Watercolors The earth watercolors are already a mix of the three primary colors, however each leans a little towards one primary or secondary color. For instance, Burnt Sienna has a strong orange leaning, Raw Umber has a slight greenish tinge, Raw Sienna is a yellowish brown with a slight greenish tinge, while Yellow Continue Reading …

The watercolor color mixing formula

Cerulean Blue mixed with Aureolin results in a bright green color

Color mixing We can create a very simple formula from what was covered in the previous segment on color mixing, that will tell us whether we will end up with a dull (tertiary – three primary colors) or more pure color (secondary – two primary colors) from the mixture of two pigments. If we mix Continue Reading …

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